It is always a big day for a bear at ABR when he or she gets out into a Wild Enclosure, and Cornelius had his big day, being released into Wild Enclosure #4.  He was displaying the typical behavior of a yearling that is feeling better and wants OUT of confinement, and fortunately he finished his worm medication so the curator was able to let him out.

Cornelius

Cornelius, as he looked just before his release into Wild Enclosure #4.

As soon as he was outside, he explored his new, wide open spaces.  His nose led the way and he found some good things to eat: Mazuri bear diet pellets, peanuts, and pears.  As soon as he heard a sound, he scampered up a tree, just as a good yearling is supposed to do.

Cornelius

Cornelius explores his enclosure.

Cornelius

Cornelius is watchful and alert as he explores.

At the moment he has this enclosure all to himself, but it won’t be his alone for too long.

Cedar Bear has finished his meds.  His head wound has healed and he will soon be ready to move outside.  The curators are pleased that he is eating well.

Cedar Bear

Cedar Bear will move outside soon.

Bailey and Clarence Bear are both eating soft foods and bear milk replacement formula.  They have to have measured amounts, to let their systems become adjusted to eating again.  Bailey hides when she hears the curator approach, but we do have a photo of Clarence Bear in his culvert den.

Clarence Bear

Clarence Bear in his culvert den.

Other yearlings are making good progress in weight gain.  Here are a few of them, looking much rounder than when they arrived.

Flora Bear

Flora Bear forages. She is becoming a chubby cubby.

Tucker Bear

Tucker Bear starts to climb a tree. He has gained a good amount of weight.

Herrbie Bear

Herbie Bear is out for a walk. It looks like he is a bear on a mission.

Derby and Gamble

Derby Bear and Gamble Bear are looking good.

Even tiny Snowflake Bear looks healthier and plumper today.

Snowflake Bear

Snowflake Bear is up in a tree in her enclosure.

All of these bears still have some growing to do, but we are happy to see them thriving at ABR.  Before they were rescued, they were just barely surviving.